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  • Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in NURS 271. This course builds on the content of NURS 270 and continues to focus on nursing care of clients with altered health states of an increasingly complex nature. Emphasis will be on critical thinking and decision-making skills. The clinical focus in this course is complex care management with a variety of clinical sites utilized. 01/22/2013-03/12/2013 LECTURE Monday, Tuesday 08:30AM - 11:30AM, Roll Building, Room 203 01/23/2013-03/07/2013 LABORATORY Wednesday, Thursday Times to be AnnouncedHospital, Room X
  • Uses a theory and applied perspective in formal and informal groups. Emphasis is placed on the use of groups in social work practice, skill development, leadership, team building, decision making, consensus building, and problem solving techniques. Also examines the dynamics of self-directed groups.
  • A study and evaluation of classical and contemporary theories of what constitutes right and wrong, good and bad, inhuman conduct, with emphasis on the implications of these theories for resolving contemporary moral problems in the business environment and in professional settings. The corrosion of dogmatic ethical positions by skepticism and relativism is examined, and helpful responses are introduced. Problems in the workplace will be discussed.
  • This course provides an overview of technology systems to those who practice in the health care arena. Emphasis will be placed on the interface between practice and health care information, the understanding of management systems to improve productivity and the use of technology to aid in research.
  • Designed to acquaint candidates with the use of microcomputers as a tool in instruction, candidates are introduced to various types of instructional programs to learn how to effectively evaluate software. Candidates will understand how to integrate multimedia, digital cameras, scanners, classroom web pages, electronic report cards and assessment programs, Internet, and e-mail into the curriculum. In addition, hands-on computer assignments will allow the student to document and integrate technology as a part of course work and the required portfolio.
  • This course is designed to improve oral and written communication skills by refining study and research skills, using professional vocabulary, and sharing research findings about business trends and issues.
  • This course provides principles of the professional image of nursing, incorporating leadership skills within organizations and how the profession is viewed from different dimensions. This course will discuss trends in nursing, the history of the profession and its impact on how it is perceived today. Students will gain an insight into the importance of the image along with the value of advocacy for the profession at many levels. Content includes characteristics of a productive health care environment and changes in structure, process or systems to assure quality and safety in care delivery.
  • The senior capstone course is designed to assess, evaluate, and examine the level of mastery and knowledge of principles and skills. This course will address critical thinking, communication, creativity, and social and cultural relations. Students will demonstrate abilities through various measures; completion of the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • This course develops the concept and merit of research, including hypothesis formulation, statistical inference, and a survey of methodologies. It requires development of a formal research proposal and examines qualitative and quantitative theory. Topics include research sources, methods and designs, statistics, techniques, research tools, computer applications, and other approaches to inquiry. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • This course facilitates an understanding of democratic ideals, policy-making institutions, and processes within the American political system. Students will analyze the role of mass media and its influence on public opinion, institutions of government, and the politics of public policy. It is designed as a survey course, presenting literature across a wide range of topics in the study of American politics.
  • This course makes a study of the forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in the flow of goods and services from production to consumption. The course also focuses on the marketing, promotion, advertising, and pricing of goods and services internationally.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • This course will focus on practical strategies for interacting with students displaying challenging behaviors. The identification of and causes for challenging behaviors will be discussed, with the emphasis placed on maintaining and building positive student-teacher and student-student relationships. Appropriate data collection methods will be stressed as a key component in changing behavior. Specific topics to be covered include: motivators, preventions techniques, reinforcement, reductive methods, behavioral contracting, self-monitoring, classroomwide systems, and individual strategies to improve behavior and social interactions. A field placement experience of twenty (20) hours is required.
  • Through integration of the arts (visual, musical, dance, and theater) with the four core content areas, teachers can explore various pathways to help diverse students demonstrate proficiency in meeting the content expectations and guidelines. Museum visits, experts in residence, classroom visits and/or videos, performances, and service learning opportunities will expand teachers' pedagogical repertoire for engaging students in the arts. Teachers will learn to create authentic performance rubrics for arts-integrated instruction so students can create, perform, and respond through the arts into all disciplines.
  • This course introduces the study of the English language from its origin to the present. It provides a study of the basic facts of language acquisition, language history, and language variation across cultures and social groups with an emphasis on practical application. Required for the Language Arts Major and Minor.
  • The course will develop ways to integrate writing across subject areas, examine methodologies in the classroom, and construct mateirals for teaching writing. This course requies a field placement experience of fifteen (15) hours. Required for the Language Arts Major and Minor.
  • The capstone course examines the interrelationships of the various business functions from the viewpoint of middle management's decision process. Heavy emphasis is placed on both oral and written case study analysis and completion of the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • This course is designed to improve oral and written communication skills by refining study and research skills, using professional vocabulary, and sharing research findings about business trends and issues.
  • The senior capstone course is designed to assess, evaluate, and examine the level of mastery and knowledge of principles and skills. Students will demonstrate abilities through various measures. Students will also complete the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • This course provides students an evidence-based theory for the development of best practice leadership knowledge and skill. Content includes analysis of patient care outcomes, team building and theory and implementation strategies for change. Requires a practicum experience for application of theory learned to take a leadership role in nursing.
  • A review of the health status of Calhoun County and its individual communities in comparison to the state and the nation. Content focuses on behavioral risk factors, chronic illnesses, communicable diseases, disease incidence and prevalence, preventable hospitalizations, indicators of lack of access to care, health care resource utilization, and wellness promotion/illness prevention.
  • This course develops the concept and merit of research, including hypothesis formulation, statistical inference, and a survey of methodologies. It requires development of a formal research proposal and examines qualitative and quantitative theory. Topics include research sources, methods and designs, statistics, techniques, research tools, computer applications, and other approaches to inquiry. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • This course develops the concept and merit of research, including hypothesis formulation, statistical inference, and a survey of methodologies. It requires development of a formal research proposal and examines qualitative and quantitative theory. Topics include research sources, methods and designs, statistics, techniques, research tools, computer applications, and other approaches to inquiry. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • This course develops the concept and merit of research, including hypothesis formulation, statistical inference, and a survey of methodologies. It requires development of a formal research proposal and examines qualitative and quantitative theory. Topics include research sources, methods and designs, statistics, techniques, research tools, computer applications, and other approaches to inquiry. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • Uses a theory and applied perspective in formal and informal groups. Emphasis is placed on the use of groups in social work practice, skill development, leadership, team building, decision making, consensus building, and problem solving techniques. Also examines the dynamics of self-directed groups.
  • Uses a theory and applied perspective in formal and informal groups. Emphasis is placed on the use of groups in social work practice, skill development, leadership, team building, decision making, consensus building, and problem solving techniques. Also examines the dynamics of self-directed groups.
  • Uses a theory and applied perspective in formal and informal groups. Emphasis is placed on the use of groups in social work practice, skill development, leadership, team building, decision making, consensus building, and problem solving techniques. Also examines the dynamics of self-directed groups.
  • A study of a broad range of concepts, theories, and practices important for basic understanding of leadership. Topics on the various styles and environments in which effective leaders lead their lives and manage their relationships. Includes application of leadership principles to realistic situations and problems, resulting in quality, productivity, and profitability as organizations attempt to achieve their objectives.
  • A study and evaluation of classical and contemporary theories of what constitutes right and wrong, good and bad, inhuman conduct, with emphasis on the implications of these theories for resolving contemporary moral problems in the business environment and in professional settings. The corrosion of dogmatic ethical positions by skepticism and relativism is examined, and helpful responses are introduced. Problems in the workplace will be discussed.
  • A study and evaluation of classical and contemporary theories of what constitutes right and wrong, good and bad, inhuman conduct, with emphasis on the implications of these theories for resolving contemporary moral problems in the business environment and in professional settings. The corrosion of dogmatic ethical positions by skepticism and relativism is examined, and helpful responses are introduced. Problems in the workplace will be discussed.
  • Topics in human resources management such as advanced organizational behavior, managing performance appraisals, employee rights, strategic human resources management, grievance procedures, and arbitration and mediation.
  • This is an introductory course in the calculation, use, interpretation, evaluation, reporting of statistical measurements using various applications of interest. Students will study and apply examples of probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. Students will research, write, present, and defend a valid statistical study. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • This is an introductory course in the calculation, use, interpretation, evaluation, reporting of statistical measurements using various applications of interest. Students will study and apply examples of probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. Students will research, write, present, and defend a valid statistical study. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • This course is designed to engage the student in representative short stories of acknowledged merit. Attention will focus on approaches for understanding literature which will include close text analysis, in addition to historical, archetypal, psychological, sociological, symbolic and philosophical approaches. Discussion on theme and insights into the human condition will frame every class.
  • The senior capstone course is designed to assess, evaluate, and examine the level of mastery and knowledge of principles and skills. This course will address critical thinking, communication, creativity, and social and cultural relations. Students will demonstrate abilities through various measures; completion of the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • This writing and reading intensive course is based on the Miller College Mission Statement: 'The College values student learning, critical thinking,oral and written communication skills, and an understanding of a globally-oriented world.' This course includes essay, professional, and research writing; oral presentations; critical reading and thinking; a major project; and introduces the student to the Miller College required portfolio. Students are encouraged to take this course in their first semester at Miller College. The knowledge gained will be useful in all other Miller College courses. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • This section is a hybrid format.

    This writing and reading intensive course is based on the Miller College Mission Statement: "The College values student learning, critical thinking, oral and written communication skills, and an understanding of a globally oriented world." This course includes essay, professional, and research writing; oral presentations; critical reading and thinking; a major project; and introduces the student to the Miller College required portfolio. Students are encouraged to take this course in their first semester at Miller College. The knowledge gained will be useful in all other Miller College courses. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • This writing and reading intensive course is based on the Miller College Mission Statement: 'The College values student learning, critical thinking,oral and written communication skills, and an understanding of a globally-oriented world.' This course includes essay, professional, and research writing; oral presentations; critical reading and thinking; a major project; and introduces the student to the Miller College required portfolio. Students are encouraged to take this course in their first semester at Miller College. The knowledge gained will be useful in all other Miller College courses. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • This course will provide students an opportunity to learn how to deal with the ethical and professional issues that most affect the actual practice of counseling and related helping professions. It will provide information students will need for the process of resolving the basic ethical issues they will face in their career. Through lectures, demonstrations, small-group discussions, and experiential activities, students will have an opportunity to problem solve various issues and dilemmas counselors often encounter.
  • Overview of human diversity and ethnic, cultural, and minority issues; analyzes the present status of groups at risk and the consequences of prejudice and institutional discrimination. Develops crosscultural sensitivity and strategies to eliminate prejudicial practices.
  • This course will focus on the most critical strategic issues in health care and allocating limited resources to address them. Techniques for budgeting, preparing financial data, aligning stakeholders, clearly stating benefits of the planning process, and instilling farsightedness and creativity into the strategic planning process will be discussed. Techniques for budgeting and monitoring consistent and effective policy and strategy. Major functions within a firm. Strategic integration, ethics, and international competition.

    preparing financial data, aligning stakeholders, clearly stating benefits of the planning process, and instilling farsightedness and creativity into the strategic planning process will be discussed.
  • This course provides an overview of technology systems to those who practice in the health care arena. Emphasis will be placed on the interface between practice and health care information, the understanding of management systems to improve productivity and the use of technology to aid in research.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • A candidate must complete an internship of 15 weeks in a regular classroom under the direct supervision of an experienced certified tenured teacher. See section entitled “Teacher Certification Program.” Required for all elementary certification candidates. This seminar accompanies the student internship experience. It reviews many facets of the teaching profession while involved in student internship. It concentrates on analysis of common problems, general school policies, and the role of all professionals in education, additional coursework on certification and updating a professional portfolio to reflect the successful meeting of the pre-service teacher education standards, refining of a personal philosophy of education, and completion of the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.

  • Communication between parents, teachers, and exceptional individuals is crucial to the success of children with learning disabilities and other exceptionalities in the regular classroom. An exploration of the dynamics of parents' reactions to their children and adolescents manifesting an exceptionality allows parents and teachers to enhance communication and access community support systems. Parents' rights, the advocate relationship, parent education, and techniques of interviewing and conferencing will be examined in light of individuals with exceptionalities in order to enhance social awareness, participation, and independent learning. This course requires a field placement experience of twenty (20) hours. Required for the Learning Disabilities Major.
  • This course will examine the theory behind the term learning disabilities and apply it to the classroom in a manner that requires candidates to understand brain research, cognitive function, and psychological processing. The meaning and implications of learning disabilities for children and adolescents will be examined in light of perceptual, academic, and social/emotional rubrics within the general classroom. This course requires a field placement experience of twenty (20) hours. Required for the Learning Disabilities Major.
  • This course examines modern elementary school curriculum, its philosophy, structure, organization, methods of curriculum development, methods of instruction including the use of technology, and strategies for meeting the needs of the exceptional child. In conjunction with a practicum, it develops general and specific methods of teaching children in science, social studies, fine arts, mathematics, language arts, and integrating two or more into the same instructional lessons. The learner will apply the theory to practice by developing a tenday, content-specific unit supported by individual daily lesson plans, producing a comprehensive classroom management plan, and collaboratively problem solving in small and whole groups. A field placement experience of twenty (20) hours is required. Required for Elementary Education Professional Education Sequence.
  • This course requires field placement experience working full-time for three weeks with a practicing reading specialist. Required for all Reading Minors.

  • This course presents instructional materials, resources, strategies, and ways to integrate social science concepts for children. Themes of historical perspective (time and chronology, comprehending the past, analyzing and interpreting the past, and judging decisions from the past), geographic perspective (diversity of people, places, and cultures; human/environment interaction; location, movement, and connection; regions, patterns, and processes; and global issues and events), civic perspective (purposes of government, ideals of American democracy, democracy in action, USA politics and government, and USA government and world affairs), and economic perspective (individual and household choices, business choices, the role of government, economic systems, and trade). Fifteen (15) hours of field placement experience is required. Required for Elementary Education Minors. This course does not count toward a Social Studies Major.
  • An overview of the science curriculum emphasizing the foundations of science, practical aspects of teaching science, scientific methods, and constructivist methods. Candidates will create documents in preparation for a 10 lesson unit plan to be completed in the following course. Themes of electromagnetic interactions, physical and chemical changes, measurement, forms of energy, energy transfer, motion, energy conservation, sound, and light will be covered. Field placement experience of fifteen (15) hours is required. Required for Elementary Education Minors. This course is not counted as part of the Integrated Science Major or Minor.

  • This course provides techniques and principles in selecting, evaluating, and promoting young adult literature. The candidate will survey the themes and a selection of authors who have made a significant contribution to the field of youth literature. Required for all Reading Minors and Language Arts Majors and Minors.
  • This course is designed to present an introduction to informal testing measures used to diagnose and remediate reading problems. Emphasis will be placed on analysis and remediation of reading difficulties and prevention measures currently utilized in elementary schools and recommended by effective research. Discussions will focus on how to help young children become successful readers. Field placement experience is required as an integral part of this course. This course requires a field placement experience of thirty (30) hours. Required for all Reading Minors.
  • This is an overview course providing a foundation for further work in the areas of reading, language arts, and content area instruction. Students will gain an understanding of the reading process, acquire knowledge of the components of reading instruction, and explore strategies for teaching a diversified student population. It will examine literacy issues that begin at birth and develop through 18 years of age. Areas of language arts (reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing) will be studied in an interactive, integrated manner. A field placement experience of fifteen (15) hours is required. Required for Elementary Education Minors.
  • Focusing on the developmental theories of the learning and cognitive processes, emotion, motivation, and competency and their implications for teaching in the K-12 classrooms, attention is given to special problems in formal K-12 education. This course requires a field placement experience of fifteen (15) hours.
  • This course examines the ways that culture enriches and challenges the school and community and how appropriate instructional objectives match the academic, social/emotional, physical, cultural, and behavioral needs of the student. Strategies for suitable instruction will be linked to understanding how learning develops over time and within cultures. An examination of literature, classroom methods, and a general philosophy, which encompasses inclusion, tolerance, and understanding will be studied. This course requires a field placement experience of ten (10) hours.
  • Candidates will work in a supervised K-12 school setting on a weekly basis, assisting children and serving as a teacher aide. A field placement of forty (40) contact hours over the course of the semester is required. Candidates will also attend a semester-long, weekly seminar engaging in reading and writing assignments and class discussions. This course introduces candidates to the foundations of the Teacher Education Program at Miller College, including procedures, required course work, the MTTC, and written and electronic portfolios. All field placements are arranged by the Field Placement Coordinator.
  • This course provides an overview of influences on the deep structure of world cultures. Students will learn skills to increase the likelihood of successful communication among cultures by examining concepts of history, time, family, sex, religion, stages in life, stereotypes, and nonverbal communication as well as verbal communication. Students will learn about cultures of various continents to broaden their appreciation of the richness of world cultural diversity in our globally-oriented world. Particular attention will be given to increasing positive intercultural communication in the world of business, health, care, teacher education, and daily life.
  • This course is designed to develop skills in design, creation, and delivery of effective quality presentations. Included in the class will be instruction in methodology, concepts, operation of appropriate software and hardware, creative strategies and design, and a demonstration of mastery with multiple presentations.
  • This course is designed to develop skills in design, creation, and delivery of effective quality presentations. Included in the class will be instruction in methodology, concepts, operation of appropriate software and hardware, creative strategies and design, and a demonstration of mastery with multiple presentations.
  • The capstone course examines the interrelationships of the various business functions from the viewpoint of middle management's decision process. Heavy emphasis is placed on both oral and written case study analysis and completion of the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • This course is designed to improve oral and written communication skills by refining study and research skills, using professional vocabulary, and sharing research findings about business trends and issues.
  • An overview of financial management for business or business-related majors. Analysis of financial statements, financial markets, and securities. Also included will be a review of risk and valuation, asset pricing, and capital structure. International, current, and ethical implications will be explored.
  • An overview of financial management for business or business-related majors. Analysis of financial statements, financial markets, and securities. Also included will be a review of risk and valuation, asset pricing, and capital structure. International, current, and ethical implications will be explored.
  • This course is designed to offer students a solid foundation in financial accounting with strong emphasis placed on the theory and practice of economics including: survey and evaluation of balance sheets; expense statements, origin and purpose; cash flow analysis in relation to planning; decision making; cost controls; analysis of gross domestic output; cyclical variability; general level of prices and employment; and the effects of demand and supply.
  • The senior capstone course is designed to assess, evaluate, and examine the level of mastery and knowledge of principles and skills. Students will demonstrate abilities through various measures. Students will also complete the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • Students will develop and present a research-based project that provides practical applications of nursing theory. Topics may include health care problems in the community, or a health-related issue in a chosen area of clinical practice.
  • This course focuses on disorders affecting cells, organs, and systems involved in the regulation and function of the human body. Topics include the affect of diseases on structures, functions, and systems of the human body and the influence of genetics, environment, and age on these diseases.
  • A study of the principles of core drug knowledge and patient-related variables as they apply to the nursing management of drug therapy. Includes an emphasis on assessing and evaluating patient responses to drug therapy and other variables affecting these responses.
  • A review of the health status of Calhoun County and its individual communities in comparison to the state and the nation. Content focuses on behavioral risk factors, chronic illnesses, communicable diseases, disease incidence and prevalence, preventable hospitalizations, indicators of lack of access to care, health care resource utilization, and wellness promotion/illness prevention.
  • A survey of the financial reporting process, a detailed study of financial statements, application of accounting theory to working capital management categories, and analysis of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
  • This writing and reading intensive course is based on the Miller College Mission Statement: 'The College values student learning, critical thinking,oral and written communication skills, and an understanding of a globally-oriented world.' This course includes essay, professional, and research writing; oral presentations; critical reading and thinking; a major project; and introduces the student to the Miller College required portfolio. Students are encouraged to take this course in their first semester at Miller College. The knowledge gained will be useful in all other Miller College courses. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • Techniques for budgeting and monitoring consistent and effective policy and strategy. Major functions within a firm. Strategic integration, ethics, and international competition.
  • This course develops the concept and merit of research, including hypothesis formulation, statistical inference, and a survey of methodologies. It requires development of a formal research proposal and examines qualitative and quantitative theory. Topics include research sources, methods and designs, statistics, techniques, research tools, computer applications, and other approaches to inquiry. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • Analytical reading and analyzing of a variety of rhetorical situations will drive the course materials. Students will look at all forms of rhetoric such as academic essays, trade journals/publications, film, television, print media, from magazines to billboards, in an effort to develop an aesthetic and critical view in analyzing the message being delivered, and responding to such messages in the formal academic essay or professional position paper. Students will practice advanced formal writing both on an individual basis and in a team setting appropriate to different audiences, occasions, and professions. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • This is an introductory course in the calculation, use, interpretation, evaluation, reporting of statistical measurements using various applications of interest. Students will study and apply examples of probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. Students will research, write, present, and defend a valid statistical study. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • This is an introductory course in the calculation, use, interpretation, evaluation, reporting of statistical measurements using various applications of interest. Students will study and apply examples of probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. Students will research, write, present, and defend a valid statistical study. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • A study and evaluation of classical and contemporary theories of what constitutes right and wrong, good and bad, inhuman conduct, with emphasis on the implications of these theories for resolving contemporary moral problems in the business environment and in professional settings. The corrosion of dogmatic ethical positions by skepticism and relativism is examined, and helpful responses are introduced. Problems in the workplace will be discussed.
  • This course provides an overview of classroom and behavior management theories and techniques. Course topics will include classroom organization, setting individual and group behavioral expectations, developing and implementing classroom rules and procedures, working proactively with students, and analyzing a variety of behavioral and management philosophies. Included in this course are research and instructional techniques utilized to design, monitor, assess, and evaluate instructional plans. This course requires a field placement experience of fifteen (15) hours.
  • This course is designed to improve oral and written communication skills by refining study and research skills, using professional vocabulary, and sharing research findings about business trends and issues.
  • This course provides the opportunity for students to learn the theory and strategies for diagnosing conflicts, recognizing catalysts and perpetuators of conflicts, and to bring about plans for implementation of agreements that lead to cooperative outcomes in conflict situations. Topics include causes of conflict, perceptions and characteristics of conflicts, types of conflicts, common reactions to conflict, conflict management styles, consideration for emotions, identity, and power within a conflict situation, effective communication, and alternative dispute resolution methods.
  • A study of the origin and evolution of the American family as a social institution and the relationship of family structure to social organizations. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the family from colonial days to its contemporary forms and the larger social context within which the family has developed.
  • Inclusive education begins with the overall philosophy of education and how it views students with disabilities in the general classroom. Appropriate instructional objectives, assessments, and adaptations to the regular education curriculum will be examined to fit the academic, social/emotional, physical, and behavioral needs of the children and adolescents in an inclusive educational setting. Adaptations to the regular education curriculum will be assessed and matched with the academic, social/emotional, physical, and behavioral needs of the child or adolescent. The conditions and strategies to maintain suitable instruction will be linked to the learning goals of the individual student. The role of the general education teacher as a member of the Individual Educational Plan team will be stressed in light of other important relationships, such as those with parents, paraprofessionals, and other teachers. This course requires a field placement experience of ten (10) hours. Required for the Learning Disabilities Major.
  • This course examines the role and effects of local, state, and national elections and public opinion on American political institutions. Topics include election law, polling methods, and classic case studies.
  • This course studies legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on Common-Law employment issues, Equal Employment Opportunity, Employee Welfare Programs, and Labor Relations Law with cases relating to these and other areas.
  • A course designed to understand financial management of multi-national firms. Among those topics covered are investment companies, risk management, cost of capital, budgeting, crosscultural and ethical considerations. Also included will be a review of derivatives, source of funds, and managing short-term assets.
  • This course focuses on global economics integration, emerging market economics, and the effects these trends will have on both service and manufacturing industries in the short and long term. Other global business issues will include: the European Union (EU), North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA), and the World Trade Organization (WTO); environmental considerations in business operations; the influences of political and legal environments on the markets; the strategies for business entry; transportation logistics; and the development of management talent.
  • This course will prepare teacher candidates to create effective instruction in Health and Physical Education based on Michigan Content Standards. Canidates will participate in experiences to develop age appropriate and effective lessons that incorporate cognitive skills, health concepts, fitness, motor skills, and personal social skills to assist elementary students in developing healthy lifestyles. Integration of other content areas will also be included. Some physical participation and observation of physical education instruction may be required.
  • Overview of human diversity and ethnic, cultural, and minority issues; analyzes the present status of groups at risk and the consequences of prejudice and institutional discrimination. Develops cross-cultural sensitivity and strategies to eliminate prejudicial practices.
  • Overview of human diversity and ethnic, cultural, and minority issues; analyzes the present status of groups at risk and the consequences of prejudice and institutional discrimination. Develops crosscultural sensitivity and strategies to eliminate prejudicial practices.
  • This writing and reading intensive course is based on the Miller College Mission Statement: 'The College values student learning, critical thinking,oral and written communication skills, and an understanding of a globally-oriented world.' This course includes essay, professional, and research writing; oral presentations; critical reading and thinking; a major project; and introduces the student to the Miller College required portfolio. Students are encouraged to take this course in their first semester at Miller College. The knowledge gained will be useful in all other Miller College courses. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • This writing and reading intensive course is based on the Miller College Mission Statement: 'The College values student learning, critical thinking,oral and written communication skills, and an understanding of a globally-oriented world.' This course includes essay, professional, and research writing; oral presentations; critical reading and thinking; a major project; and introduces the student to the Miller College required portfolio. Students are encouraged to take this course in their first semester at Miller College. The knowledge gained will be useful in all other Miller College courses. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word is expected.
  • A study of a broad range of concepts, theories, and practices important for basic understanding of leadership. Topics on the various styles and environments in which effective leaders lead their lives and manage their relationships. Includes application of leadership principles to realistic situations and problems, resulting in quality, productivity, and profitability as organizations attempt to achieve their objectives.
  • Based on the different, not deficient, theory of diversity, this course explores the underlying principles of linguistic and cultural differences. Emphasis on building strategies for successfully teaching reading and writing to children for whom English is another language will be an essential outcome of the class. Each candidate will have the opportunity to tutor a child who is learning English as another language. This course requires a field placement experience of ten (10) hours. Required for the Learning Disabilities Major and Language Arts Major and all Reading Minors.

  • A survey of the financial reporting process, a detailed study of financial statements, application of accounting theory to working capital management categories, and analysis of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
  • A continuation of the techniques and approaches used in ACCT 310 with a focus on evaluating the information required for management planning and control systems. Additional case studies will be required. Added topics include further study into standard costing, ABC costing, transfer pricing models, internal budgeting, department service costs, and evaluating management processes.
  • Candidates explore ways children learn mathematical concepts and ways to help children overcome common mistakes. Candidates will design and develop lessons and assessments for elementary and middle school, using Michigan benchmarks in mathematics. Mathematical content includes elementary probability, measurement, geometry, and applications. This course requires a total of twenty (20) hours of field placement experience and tutoring. Required for Elementary Education Minors. This course is not counted as part of the Mathematics Major or Minor.
  • Modern Poetry is a study of representative literary works from the late 1800's to the mid 1900's. It begins with a study of the forces shaping what is considered modern, and then operates within this framework to examine representative poems of notable authors.
  • This course provides students an evidence-based theory for the development of best practice leadership knowledge and skill. Content includes analysis of patient care outcomes, team building and theory and implementation strategies for change. Requires a practicum experience for application of theory learned to take a leadership role in nursing.
  • Students in this course will engage in the application of ethical principles in the healthcare arena. Cases in ethics will be presented with real world applications to care at the bedside as well as in the management setting. ethics from a human resource and research perspective will also be explored.
  • Students will develop and present a research-based project that provides practical applications of nursing theory. Topics may include health care problems in the community, or a health-related issue in a chosen area of clinical practice.
  • Uses a theory and applied perspective in formal and informal groups. Emphasis is placed on the use of groups in social work practice, skill development, leadership, team building, decision making, consensus building, and problem solving techniques. Also examines the dynamics of self-directed groups.
  • Uses a theory and applied perspective in formal and informal groups. Emphasis is placed on the use of groups in social work practice, skill development, leadership, team building, decision making, consensus building, and problem solving techniques. Also examines the dynamics of self-directed groups.
  • This course focuses on disorders affecting cells, organs, and systems involved in the regulation and function of the human body. Topics include the affect of diseases on structures, functions, and systems of the human body and the influence of genetics, environment, and age on these diseases.
  • A study of the principles of core drug knowledge and patient-related variables as they apply to the nursing management of drug therapy. Includes an emphasis on assessing and evaluating patient responses to drug therapy and other variables affecting these responses.
  • This course is designed to develop skills in design, creation, and delivery of effective quality presentations. Included in the class will be instruction in methodology, concepts, operation of appropriate software and hardware, creative strategies and design, and a demonstration of mastery with multiple presentations.
  • This overview course provides a foundation for further work in the area of reading. Candidates will gain an understanding of the reading process, acquire knowledge of the components of reading instruction, and explore strategies for teaching a diversified student population. This course requires a field placement experience of forty (40) hours. Required for all Reading Minors and the Language Arts Major and Minor.

  • This course develops the concept and merit of research, including hypothesis formulation, statistical inference, and a survey of methodologies. It requires development of a formal research proposal and examines qualitative and quantitative theory. Topics include research sources, methods and designs, statistics, techniques, research tools, computer applications, and other approaches to inquiry. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • This course develops the concept and merit of research, including hypothesis formulation, statistical inference, and a survey of methodologies. It requires development of a formal research proposal and examines qualitative and quantitative theory. Topics include research sources, methods and designs, statistics, techniques, research tools, computer applications, and other approaches to inquiry. Basic proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel is expected.
  • A continuation of EDUC 320 - Science for Teachers I, this course will explore themes of light, sound, heat, energy transfer, atmosphere, weather and climate, electricity, magnetism and waves. An emphasis is placed on inquiry-based and problem-solving constructivist approaches to practical teaching. Additional topecs to be covered include safety issues, legal obligations, and management strategies compatible with activity-based teaching, use of technology, and instructional strategies and assessment. Field placement experience of fifteen (15) hours is required. Required for Elementary Education Minors. This course is not counted as part of the Integrated Science Major or Minor.
  • The capstone course examines the interrelationships of the various business functions from the viewpoint of middle management's decision process. Heavy emphasis is placed on both oral and written case study analysis and completion of the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • The senior capstone course is designed to assess, evaluate, and examine the level of mastery and knowledge of principles and skills. Students will demonstrate abilities through various measures. Students will also complete the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.
  • A candidate must complete an internship of 15 weeks in a regular classroom under the direct supervision of an experienced certified tenured teacher. See section entitled “Teacher Certification Program.” Required for all elementary certification candidates. This seminar accompanies the student internship experience. It reviews many facets of the teaching profession while involved in student internship. It concentrates on analysis of common problems, general school policies, and the role of all professionals in education, additional coursework on certification and updating a professional portfolio to reflect the successful meeting of the pre-service teacher education standards, refining of a personal philosophy of education, and completion of the electronic portfolio, which will include artifacts from each class, evidence of service learning, reflections on program objectives, and other student selections.

  • The focus of this course will be a study of significant literary works for which there is contemporary interest. Literature will be chosen from a variety of genres and is not intended to be representative of any particular nation, culture, gender, or orientation. Selections may vary between semesters.
  • A continuation of Social Studies for Teachers I, this course explores the state model social studies program and implementation of the strands into the curriculum. Also covered are themes of inquiry (information processing and conducting investigations), public discourse and decision making (identifying and analyzing issues, group discussion, and persuasive writing), and citizen involvement (responsible personal conduct). Research, documentation of primary sources, uses of technology, instructional strategies and assessments will be further developed. Fifteen (15) hours of field placement experience is required. Required for Elementary Education Minors. This course does not count toward a Social Studies Major.

  • In this course focus will be on the Clinical Teaching Model as a process to diagnose, teach and evaluate using methodology appropriate for elementary and secondary students with learning disabilities. Candidates in this course will gain knowledge about currently-used methods and curricula in inclusion and special education classrooms. Candidates will design an instructional module for a classroom for their final project and implement a portion of it under supervision in their field placement experience. The use of technology will preside over all elements of the course, especially through the use of adaptive materials,the Internet, and the World Wide Web. This course requires a field placement experience of thirty-six (36) hours. Required for the Learning Disabilities Major.
  • A supervised, structured assignment of seven weeks in a secondary resource room or co-teaching special education position, accompanied by three seminar sessions with the special education intern supervisor. The candidate is required to demonstrate ability to assess needs, plan and implement instruction, and evaluate the effectiveness of instruction for students with learning disabilities. Required for the Learning Disabilities Major.
  • Through integration of the arts (visual, musical, dance, and theater) with the four core content areas, teachers can explore various pathways to help diverse students demonstrate proficiency in meeting the content expectations and guidelines. Museum visits, experts in residence, classroom visits and/or videos, performances, and service learning opportunities will expand teachers' pedagogical repertoire for engaging students in the arts. Teachers will learn to create authentic performance rubrics for arts-integrated instruction so students can create, perform, and respond through the arts into all disciplines.
  • This course examines various theoretical approaches to counseling. Students will be exposed to contrasting models underlying both individual and group counseling. Through lectures, demonstrations, small-group discussions, and experiential activities, students will have an opportunity to critically evaluate the practical applications of contemporary counseling perspectives.
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